Posts Tagged ‘action’

Epistory: Major Update

Friday, June 10th, 2016

After weeks of hard work, we present to you the new and shinier version of Epistory with Mod & Profiles (multiple saves) support and more... You spoke and we listened. We understand it would have been better for most of you to receive the update in chunks over the weeks but given the amount of changes it was a lot easier for us to handle one big transition to the new version instead of several small incremental versions. We even had to stop planning for a workshop beta. 
Without further ado, here’s the changelist.

As always, we welcome your feedback and bug reports. 

Epistory is now out on Steam!

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Hi Fox Riders! Epistory is finally fully released. Can’t wait for you to discover the end of the game. Good luck with hours of game waiting for you.

Also, we’d like to thank all of you for the support and love during the early access. Don’t hesitate to share our new trailer around you.

In the coming weeks, we plan to fix the very few remaining bugs you could find in this version. We are even thinking of adding more languages.

But now let’s party!

Play the game here.

Indie of the Year 2015

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

Update: We didn’t make it but we’d like to thanks all the people who voted for Epistory. Next year you’ll do it! 

Hi Folks, 

It’s the 6th Annual Indie of the Year Awards, a celebration of this year finest indie games chosen by indies fans. If you could give us a hand and vote for Epistory on IndieDB it would be great. The top 100 will be announced on the 11th of December. Let’s do our best!

Go my army. Spread the word around you! 

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Thank you very much. 

Trick or Treat! Epistory Halloween Update

Saturday, October 31st, 2015

Epistory_Pumpkin_halloweenAs promised, Epistory – Typing Chronicles is now available on Linux and Mac! If you encounter any bugs please give us a heads up and we’ll fix them as soon as possible.

The challengers amongst you will be pleased to find the new “Arena” mode in the main menu. It’s a special place where the world will finally recognize the value of your typing skills. We’re still working on the leaderboard that should come soon. It’s also a bit rough around the edges.

Note that Spanish language has been added to the game. More languages to come during the Early Access. 

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Here’s the patch note for the new version:

New Features

Added: Infinite Battle “Arena” mode, where you’ll soon be able to challenge yourself and get your name at the top of the leaderboard.

Added: Linux version

Added: Mac version

Added: Spanish version

And plenty of stuff behind the scene for the upcoming Chapter 2

Various improvements

Removed magic effect on enemies’ last word.

Special characters are displayed when the required magic is locked.

Reworked “Burning Hollow” level design.

Reworked story in “Forgotten Forest“.

Bug fix

Fixed: typing the word while it moves result in some letters not colored properly.

Fixed: avatar moving using the last letter of a word typed if the typing mode auto switch is triggered.

Fixed: auto typing mode switch was not happening if an untypeable (fire) word was displayed

Fixed: brambles were reorienting upon hit

And a lot more.

Happy Halloween to all!

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Opening Lines – Finding a Voice for Epistory

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Epistory needs to establish a subtle, layered narrative voice within its opening moments. Join the game’s writer in a deep exploration of why this story is harder to begin than most.

Wether you’re writing a game, or a movie, or a novel: it’s always difficult to start a story. There’s just so much riding on those opening moments. This difficulty is basically the premise for Epistory’s plot, in which a struggling writer is trying to start a novel. The player assumes the role of the muse, helping the story come to life.

Epistory adds an additional complication: as well as attracting the player’s interest immediately, it must also establish the narrative voice. In this article, I’ll be explaining more about what this means and how I’ve tried to solve the problem.

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What’s In A Voice?
By ‘narrative voice’, I simply mean the voice of the narrator: who is telling the story? Why? And in what context? Are they speaking to the audience directly? Are they writing a letter? Is the audience an active party in the story, or are it given a camera’s eye view into someone else’s world? Ultimately, narrative voice defines the relationship between the storyteller and the audience.

Most narrative voice is established by its medium and a few quickly-gleaned implications. When a written story starts with a line like “Call me Ishmael” (a laMoby Dick), we instantly understand that there is a person telling the story to the reader. We understand that the narrator has their old world view, and agenda, and feelings. But when we watch a film and a camera sweeps across the Earth – like no human can do – we understand that a picture of the world is being presented to us impartially. We are invited to watch through a window.

Epistory Early Access – NOW on STEAM

Whose Voice Is It Anyway?
In Epistory, the narrative voice comes from a writer who we never see. All the words of narration – from the introductory sequence to the writing stretched over the levels – are the words this writer has written in their novel. The player’s goal is to help the writer create the story: typing words and discovering things to encourage the author’s inspiration.
This is a very hard thing to explain in-game: not least because we don’t meet the writer. We have to inferher presence. Originally, the game’s script did this the obvious way: it begins with a writer saying “I hate writer’s block! How am I ever going to write this story?”, and quickly settles down into the story itself, “She looked like a lost little girl”. This establishes the narration as the writer’s voice and ensures it makes sense within the context of the game.
This works – but it’s messy because it creates two distinct narrative voices. The author’s (“I hate writer’s block!”) and the story’s (“She looked like a lost little girl”). Because we don’t really know which is which, we have to infer every time – and so there’s a constant dissonance. It’s hard to know who is telling the story. Also, writers tend not to ask themselves questions in their own prose, so the voice may not sound authentic to player.

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A New Voice
I wanted to try and do something a bit more subtle and seamless: using a single voice that represents all the narration. I’ve tried to do this by presenting the story as a work-in-progress and showing the writer’s edits. The theory runs like this:
The game begins on a black, foggy screen. A blank canvas. Then some text appears: “Once upon a time”. This is how all fairy stories start, right? The player knows that a story is beginning. But the text is quickly erased character-by-character. The story has changed, the writer’s hand is revealed by implication.
The writer tries again, and this time she writes: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”. This is how Charles Dicken’s A Tale of Two Cities - the best-selling novel of all time – begins. Even if the player doesn’t follow the reference (and most won’t!), they should understand that the story has been restarted.
But this beginning is rejected too, and so it is also erased. The pattern has been established now: the author doesn’t know how to start the story. So, third time lucky, the narrative begins in earnest: “There was a girl. And she rode on the back of a great fox.”. And hey presto – the fog clears to reveal the player-character.

Voice of Reason
Because there is only one narrative voice, the player can trust that it represents the words of a story being written around their actions. We build on this start by adding more interactions which make the player aware of the author – and vice versa – by changing text as the player interacts with the world. It’s a subtle idea, and maybe not everyone will get it. I expect most people won’t be able to articulate it. But subconsciously, I believe people will understand that a story is being written around them by an unseen author.

Successful execution relies on two things: using recognisable (or cliched) opening lines, so that the player understands what the writer is trying to achieve (ie, the beginning of a story); and a character deletion effect, so that the player is aware that the writer is deliberately erasing and rewriting text. Sound effects can help reinforce the idea of writing and erasing, too.

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This, however, is not the whole story. While we work hard to establish and contextualise the narrator’s voice early in the game – we later sow in a few seeds of dissonance. Because in Epistory, not all is what it seems… 

Help us Greenlight “Eyeball Invaders” on Steam!

Monday, September 24th, 2012

It started as a collective effort … Pretty soon Nature prevailed.

Eyeballs Invaders have landed on a mysterious planet and they need to get as many energy orbs as they can to build themselves a new spaceship. Only one tiny problem: there’s not enough room on the replacement shuttle for all of them. Let the massacre begins, cause in the end, only one will survive and go home!

The Eyeball Invaders is a free to play fast-paced multi-player action game for PC, Mac and Linux in which each player takes control of one of many different eyeball-like character and jumps his way through 5 wonderful planets and 150 tricky levels.

The Eyeball Invaders - ThumbDiscover The Eyeball Invaders world through an exciting single player adventure mode or tackle the challenges with your friends! The game will let you challenge up to seven other players over five hectic modes of play, for some local eight-player brawling madness! And if you prefer playing online, go through the steam community and game integrated lobbies to find yourself more challengers!

Control your jump power and leap left or right to catch the Orbs in the glimpse of an eye. Stick to the walls and use them as launching platforms to jump even further! Watchwords: jump, stick and brawl! Feels like something you’d like to play? Then do something about it and head over to Steam Community, where we’re waiting for your votes to get Greenlit!

Vote for The Eyeball Invaders here!

Slash them all in Slash Monsters!

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Have you ever dreamt of imposing your hands to make things move like the Mini Darth Vader does in the famous Volkswagen commercial? Imagine being able to do just that with the power of your bare fingertips! In our new free game Slash Monsters, you slash your way through 6 challenging worlds and 36 adrenaline-pumping levels!

Slash Monsters is a free marine action game in cartoon-style coming out by the end of this month. All kinds of mutant monsters are lurking deep under the sea to invade the Planet!

Your final goal will be to save the sweet starfishes from some nasty pink mutant octopi that are after them. Octopi are not their only enemy: jellyfishes, worms and sea urchins want to wipe out these helpless creatures! Can you slash them all before it’s too late?

Many awesome combos will help you earn more pearls and unlock new achievements. But that’s not it: you can also compete with your friends on who is the most lethal slayer!

Screenshot Slash Monsters iOS Android Gratos Gratuit Free

More info will be shared soon, so stay tuned to hear more about Slash Monsters and how to save the ocean from the deep sea invaders!