Posts Tagged ‘origami’

Epistory: Fluffy Friday #3 – Burning Brambles

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

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Bite sized news for small stuff. Today: Burning brambles.

fluffy_3_header

Welcome to another installment of our fluffy sweetness. If you missed our Critters gifs last week you can check them here.

Ok! To recap, we had a world quite pleasant to walk in, decent levels and dungeons, epileptic Critters… and a girl riding a giant fox fighting against monsters and corrupted nature. Fighting how? With words. I mean MAGIC FIRE WORDS!

fluffy 3 burning brambles 2 

So, here’s the fire animation, shown in our previous paper on art direction, in action. Yes, we know, burning the forest is bad but these brambles were evil, very very evil.

fluffy 3 burning brambles 3

fluffy 3 burning brambles 1 

Imagine you’re hanging around with your fox and brambles block the road: burn them! There are monsters on your way out from the dungeon: burn them! There are cute critters… wait… stop. May I draw your attention on the fine and not final spell forging animation before the girl sets the world on fire?

Hope you felt the magic. See you next week for another incredible Fluffy Friday!

Have a great week.

Epistory: Fun with bones in Unity

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

More on IndieDB

Discovery of what unity can do in terms of jiggly bones and overriding animations.

The inception

A while back, after slowly becoming mad tweaking animations and movement behavior on our avatar, I decided to have some simple fun with Unity. See where the limit was and what’s possible in a certain domain. Since I was obsessed with the character’s animation, my attention was driven towards improving what our animator gave us in terms of natural movement. Even though the animations were quite good, I wanted some physics madness in there. So I went on a quest to mess with the bones of mecanim.

It turns out it’s rather straightforward to activate the so called “jiggly bones”. A few changes in your model before export does the trick. It does however require a great deal of value tweaking and physics engine know-how. You may follow this tutorial if you want to try it for yourself.

Here’s what I could do as a quick ‘n dirty test. This will *not* be in the game. Even if the effect could be nice, It is at the bottomest bottom of our priorities.

jiggly bones 350px

 

But doing this as a playful “what if” helped me learn a lot about how Unity works with animations and physics. Even better, I would never have thought of what I’m about to show if I hadn’t gamed the system.

A few days later, the movement and animation finally polished, I found one last thing I could do, turn the head of the fox in the direction of where the avatar will go next. Providing a subconscious feedback on the movement. Using the head bone and overriding the animation, it should be possible. Right?

epistory fox head move

 

It turns out it is. This gif was taken when a bug prevented the fox to move or turn so you can clearly see that the head orientation is overridden (and a bit disturbing, sorry).

How to do it

First, you have to get a reference to your head bone:

private void Awake()
{
  HeadBone = /*find the headbone in the hierarchy*/.transform;
}

There’s nothing to do to your model. All you have to do is use the LateUpdate function which is called afterthe internal update of the animations.

private void LateUpdate()
{
  Quaternion
    look_at = Quaternion.LookRotation(Direction, new Vector3(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f));
  look_at *= Quaternion.Euler(-90.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f); // Our models are rotated
  HeadBone.rotation = look_at;
}

You can do all sorts of crazy stuff with this.

The result

fox turn head subtle 350px

 

Here you can see the result in game. Slowed down on purpose to make sure it’s seeable in a gif. The effect is very subtle but you can see that the head will always point to the right direction (almost instantly) and the body follows soon after.

The next time you are frustrated with a particular task or simply bored out of your mind after a day of repetitive tweaks. Do yourself a favor and just play with the tools on your workbench. Who knows what kind of gem you’ll unearth.

}

Epistory: Fluffy Friday #2 – Adding critters.

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

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Bite sized news for small stuff. Today: Adding critters.

header

After our world building, level crafting & dungeon inaugurating, we were left with a grim realization. For all the beauty in display, we were missing something crucial. We had a beautiful but empty painting. A canvas ready for: Life! *crackling thunder*

critters idle2

So, here they are presented with their idle animation. Minding their own business until you come along:

critters run2 text2

They’ll spawn in small groups where it’s relevant and flee when you come close. Now that the system is in place we could add more variety if we find the time. It’s not completely done but I can already tell you it adds a lot to the look & feel of the game.

We’ll show more soon and I wish you a nice week.

Epistory: Fluffy Friday #1 – Tile appearing

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

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Bite sized news for small stuff. Today: Tile appearing.

header

Today I present you a new kind of post that we will try to do regularly. As an introduction I’ll simply say that we have a lot of small juicy stuff to show that would feel lost in a bigger article. It will take the form of a few gifs or pictures and a bite size article. The topics should range from fluffy things to weird but funny glitches and all that stands in between: gameplay shorts, animation tests and so on. Now that it’s out of the way, let’s continue to…

Fluffy Friday #1

During your wandering in the world, you will slowly uncover more and more of it. Akin to a blank page filling up with words. We wanted that event to be enjoyable to watch because it marks progress in the game. So we did something like this:

tiles reveal

While this gif is not the final version we had at the time (I can still see a few bugs) there was no sense of accomplishment. Just another chunk of land coming in.

So we decided to wait. Once the gameplay mechanism is in place, your priority shifts to another gameplay element. Polish can come later, right? Yes! And we did a pass of polish on that system along with better graphics overall, I’ll let you see the differences for yourself.

tiles reveal2 part1tiles reveal2 part2

There you have it. Of course the final version could differ slightly from this and the gif doesn’t show the best framerate and color. I hope that this is already enjoyable and that you will want to see more posts like this.

Epistory: Paper on art direction

Monday, May 11th, 2015

More about the game on indieDB

A paper on art direction

The “Art Direction” is basically a set of visual rules you decide to follow during all the creation process of your project. All the visuals you will design will stick to it, and in the end your project will end up coherent, with a specific look everyone will recognize.

“Paper” please

When Epistory was just in the shape of a playable prototype, we were just finishing a serious game on 1st world war. Despite the seriousness of the theme, the Art Direction of this project was really cute, showing flat scrapbooking characters and paper styled interfaces.

Our game about 1st world war. Notice the “scrapbooking” art style !

 

We really enjoyed making all the game assets with this look, but couldn’t push the style beyond the limits. Then Epistory came within our grasp: “A muse lost into a writer’s mind, creating the world as he imagine the story, fighting against the blank page fear” ? Hell yeah ! We immediately saw that we could continue with the paper style thing, but pushing it a lot further into a full 3D game !

Art “right” Direction

We first started to look for interesting references and we made moodboards with it.

Some of our “papercraft” styled references

 

We quickly noticed that the scrapbooking style couldn’t be enough. Despite the 2D movements of the avatar, we had to make full 3D environments, and relying only on 2D paper collages would appear flat and boring. We decided to go for a more “papercraft” approach, with some additional elements taken from the origami techniques.

First 3D test to see what we could do with those papercrafting/origami techniques. Once we defined the shapes, we worked on a basic colored layout.

 

Paper pot

After testing differents approaches we ended up with a mix of different paper techniques:

> Scrapbooking for the environments ground tiles:

> Animated objects made of paper crafted volumes for destructible assets:

 

> Folded paper for texts and logos:

> Origami/folded paper for the monsters:

“Hot paper”

Once we had chosen the path of paper, all the assets had to stick with it, even special effects and particle systems ! We made “folded paper” styled textures, and used almost no alpha or additive techniques. It was complicated at first to find elemental paper styled effects to replace “classic video game effects”, but once we did the first ones we just had to stick to the technique.

 Fire effect without using the classic additive method, only with plain opaque paper sheets !

“Crapbooking”

The major drawback of this Art Direction is that it is often difficult to create assets “looking like paper” but with a non realistic look. We wanted to keep things cartoonish, with strong shapes and colorful
environments, but when you have to make a style of paper you can find in real life, the risk is to end up with a great but too realistic asset. The difficulty is to make believable paper looking assets, but still looking cartoon… It’s an everyday fight to maintain consistency between the assets, but
the challenge is motivating and we believe the final visuals of the game will make it really unique !

 

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