Posts Tagged ‘steam’

Epistory: Major Update

Friday, June 10th, 2016

After weeks of hard work, we present to you the new and shinier version of Epistory with Mod & Profiles (multiple saves) support and more... You spoke and we listened. We understand it would have been better for most of you to receive the update in chunks over the weeks but given the amount of changes it was a lot easier for us to handle one big transition to the new version instead of several small incremental versions. We even had to stop planning for a workshop beta. 
Without further ado, here’s the changelist.

As always, we welcome your feedback and bug reports. 

Epistory: New Website and Merchandising

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Hi Fox Riders!

Last week, our website has been updated to a wonderful e-shop  where you can buy t-shirts, papermasks and more of Epistory. 

Let people know how crazy you are about Typing-RPG-Adventure games and specially Epistory  

www.epistorygame.com 

 

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Epistory is now out on Steam!

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Hi Fox Riders! Epistory is finally fully released. Can’t wait for you to discover the end of the game. Good luck with hours of game waiting for you.

Also, we’d like to thank all of you for the support and love during the early access. Don’t hesitate to share our new trailer around you.

In the coming weeks, we plan to fix the very few remaining bugs you could find in this version. We are even thinking of adding more languages.

But now let’s party!

Play the game here.

Epistory Arrives on Windows, Mac, Linux March. 30

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Hi Fox Riders! The moment has come to announce that Epistory – Typing Chronicles will leave early access and be released on Steam on the 30th of March 2016. We are so enthousiastic and we can’t wait to read your feedback about the last chapters of the game. So, if the game isn’t yet in your Steam library, it’s you last chance to get it at the Early Access price! As a bonus, find below some screenshots of the upcoming chapters and a short teaser made with love. See you on the community hub!

 

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Trick or Treat! Epistory Halloween Update

Saturday, October 31st, 2015

Epistory_Pumpkin_halloweenAs promised, Epistory – Typing Chronicles is now available on Linux and Mac! If you encounter any bugs please give us a heads up and we’ll fix them as soon as possible.

The challengers amongst you will be pleased to find the new “Arena” mode in the main menu. It’s a special place where the world will finally recognize the value of your typing skills. We’re still working on the leaderboard that should come soon. It’s also a bit rough around the edges.

Note that Spanish language has been added to the game. More languages to come during the Early Access. 

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Here’s the patch note for the new version:

New Features

Added: Infinite Battle “Arena” mode, where you’ll soon be able to challenge yourself and get your name at the top of the leaderboard.

Added: Linux version

Added: Mac version

Added: Spanish version

And plenty of stuff behind the scene for the upcoming Chapter 2

Various improvements

Removed magic effect on enemies’ last word.

Special characters are displayed when the required magic is locked.

Reworked “Burning Hollow” level design.

Reworked story in “Forgotten Forest“.

Bug fix

Fixed: typing the word while it moves result in some letters not colored properly.

Fixed: avatar moving using the last letter of a word typed if the typing mode auto switch is triggered.

Fixed: auto typing mode switch was not happening if an untypeable (fire) word was displayed

Fixed: brambles were reorienting upon hit

And a lot more.

Happy Halloween to all!

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Opening Lines – Finding a Voice for Epistory

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Epistory needs to establish a subtle, layered narrative voice within its opening moments. Join the game’s writer in a deep exploration of why this story is harder to begin than most.

Wether you’re writing a game, or a movie, or a novel: it’s always difficult to start a story. There’s just so much riding on those opening moments. This difficulty is basically the premise for Epistory’s plot, in which a struggling writer is trying to start a novel. The player assumes the role of the muse, helping the story come to life.

Epistory adds an additional complication: as well as attracting the player’s interest immediately, it must also establish the narrative voice. In this article, I’ll be explaining more about what this means and how I’ve tried to solve the problem.

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What’s In A Voice?
By ‘narrative voice’, I simply mean the voice of the narrator: who is telling the story? Why? And in what context? Are they speaking to the audience directly? Are they writing a letter? Is the audience an active party in the story, or are it given a camera’s eye view into someone else’s world? Ultimately, narrative voice defines the relationship between the storyteller and the audience.

Most narrative voice is established by its medium and a few quickly-gleaned implications. When a written story starts with a line like “Call me Ishmael” (a laMoby Dick), we instantly understand that there is a person telling the story to the reader. We understand that the narrator has their old world view, and agenda, and feelings. But when we watch a film and a camera sweeps across the Earth – like no human can do – we understand that a picture of the world is being presented to us impartially. We are invited to watch through a window.

Epistory Early Access – NOW on STEAM

Whose Voice Is It Anyway?
In Epistory, the narrative voice comes from a writer who we never see. All the words of narration – from the introductory sequence to the writing stretched over the levels – are the words this writer has written in their novel. The player’s goal is to help the writer create the story: typing words and discovering things to encourage the author’s inspiration.
This is a very hard thing to explain in-game: not least because we don’t meet the writer. We have to inferher presence. Originally, the game’s script did this the obvious way: it begins with a writer saying “I hate writer’s block! How am I ever going to write this story?”, and quickly settles down into the story itself, “She looked like a lost little girl”. This establishes the narration as the writer’s voice and ensures it makes sense within the context of the game.
This works – but it’s messy because it creates two distinct narrative voices. The author’s (“I hate writer’s block!”) and the story’s (“She looked like a lost little girl”). Because we don’t really know which is which, we have to infer every time – and so there’s a constant dissonance. It’s hard to know who is telling the story. Also, writers tend not to ask themselves questions in their own prose, so the voice may not sound authentic to player.

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A New Voice
I wanted to try and do something a bit more subtle and seamless: using a single voice that represents all the narration. I’ve tried to do this by presenting the story as a work-in-progress and showing the writer’s edits. The theory runs like this:
The game begins on a black, foggy screen. A blank canvas. Then some text appears: “Once upon a time”. This is how all fairy stories start, right? The player knows that a story is beginning. But the text is quickly erased character-by-character. The story has changed, the writer’s hand is revealed by implication.
The writer tries again, and this time she writes: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”. This is how Charles Dicken’s A Tale of Two Cities - the best-selling novel of all time – begins. Even if the player doesn’t follow the reference (and most won’t!), they should understand that the story has been restarted.
But this beginning is rejected too, and so it is also erased. The pattern has been established now: the author doesn’t know how to start the story. So, third time lucky, the narrative begins in earnest: “There was a girl. And she rode on the back of a great fox.”. And hey presto – the fog clears to reveal the player-character.

Voice of Reason
Because there is only one narrative voice, the player can trust that it represents the words of a story being written around their actions. We build on this start by adding more interactions which make the player aware of the author – and vice versa – by changing text as the player interacts with the world. It’s a subtle idea, and maybe not everyone will get it. I expect most people won’t be able to articulate it. But subconsciously, I believe people will understand that a story is being written around them by an unseen author.

Successful execution relies on two things: using recognisable (or cliched) opening lines, so that the player understands what the writer is trying to achieve (ie, the beginning of a story); and a character deletion effect, so that the player is aware that the writer is deliberately erasing and rewriting text. Sound effects can help reinforce the idea of writing and erasing, too.

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This, however, is not the whole story. While we work hard to establish and contextualise the narrator’s voice early in the game – we later sow in a few seeds of dissonance. Because in Epistory, not all is what it seems… 

Epistory: SAVE THE DATE!

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015

Hi folks! We are so glad to announce the release of Epistory on Early Access. See you the 30th of September on Steam. Meanwhile, you can visit the Steam page of Epistory and put it in your wish listhttp://store.steampowered.com/app/398850

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Epistory: It all starts with (good) intentions

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

FB_avatarMore about the game on indieDB

The beginning

When you start creating a game. When you think you have a great idea to turn into a great game. When that idea has just been tested and when your team thinks it may become that great game you have in mind. There is something you have to do without waiting. You may have already done it during the early design process but the original vision has changed now that you made different rough gameplay tests and added new members to the team. That thing – the title already spoiled it – is defining your intentions.

Whether you call them guidelines, pillars, objectives or mantra, it is the long term vision, the global idea of what you want to do with your project. You should keep it to the essential, as it will serve as a reference to drive the whole production.

Epistory is a keyboard driven game. So that is obviously one of our intentions. But there is another one we have, not so obvious, and which came from its genre. Define the genre was needed to better define the game and communicate about it, and that is exactly why it was a problem.

The Typing Game Problem

Our core feature is the full keyboard control. So I already hear you say that we could just call it a typing game and move on. The problem is that, when I think of a typing game, I have two things in mind – and it’s not just me, a quick google search will give you the same results. First, it is most likely a mini-game or an edu-game. In other words, something I do not plan to play for a long time, or to have fun with. Secondly, I will only type words. No deeper gameplay, no choices. And eventually my computer will remind me that I am not a very good typer!

Do not get me wrong, those games are not all bad – some are even really fun for a while. But they are absolutely not comparable to Epistory: the term typing game gives the wrong idea. In fact, it is probably harder to explain what we try to do with Epistory using this comparison than starting from scratch – but now that we are here, I will try anyway.

How it works - Move screenshot

Playing a game means making choices

What we absolutely want in Epistory is to make it really feel like a game and not just a typing application. For that, we believe that it requires a non-linear experience and meaningful choices. And when I say meaningful choices, I am not talking about a big decision which follows you for the rest of the game – well, not only that – but constant small choices. A few examples in games would be taking the short risky path or the long safer one, exploring the east or the west of the magic forest first, upgrading one skill instead of another… Even positioning your car in the fastest racing game implies constant quick choices. You made them depending on the track, your opponents’ position, your current speed, the ideal trajectory, and so on.

To make those choices meaningful, I try to remember that as a Past – Present – Future rule. The player needs to understand that he has a choice (Present). He has to know what it means from past experiences (Past, in this game but not only). And he has to expect something in the future from his action (Future). If it is not a meaningful choice, the player is not an actor but just obeys the game as there is no other possibility of action.

We made that one of our intentions – even if it is important in every game – to make sure it was applied to Epistory’s design. I am not going to describe Epistory’s gameplay deeper on this article – there are more to come, but we will not fall into the trap of your ordinary typing game.

Main character concept

A keyboard controlled adventure

So Epistory is an exploration / adventure game, and we like to call it like that. It gives the player the opportunity to explore an imaginary world, use magical powers to interact and fight enemies, and upgrade them as he wants.

You should see the typing aspect as an opportunity, not a constraint. Because that is what we did: using a keyboard as the unique game controller to create new gameplay experiences. Not only to type words, and not only to earn points. We like to say that you will type the story – but that is for another article.

Thanks for reading. Don’t hesitate to support us on social networks.

Website coming soon

Algo-Bot has been Greenlit

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Hi Guys,

We did it! Algo-Bot has been Greenlit by the community and we would like to thank you for that!

You can imagine what it means to us to have such a great community supporting the game. We are now more confident about the reboot on Kickstarter. 

If you want to get new about the reboot you can sign up to Algo-Bot’s newsletter here.

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 THANK YOU! 

Win a PS4 or 1 out of 50 Steam games with Algo-Bot

Friday, March 7th, 2014

blog150x150Hi Folks,

To  re-launch our game  Algo-Bot, we decided to organize a new contest. The goal of this contest is to get 2000 “yes” on Steam Greenlight and try to enter top 100

All you have to do is to enter the competition, then vote on Algo-Bot at Greenlight and finally leave a comment #coderules with your Steam (You must do that to be eligible to win this game)

You can enter the contest herehttp://woobox.com/kq4ggu

There will be 3 ways to win this game:

  • 31 x Random Gamers who enter this giveaway will have a chance to win Playstation 4 and 1 out of 30 Steam Games. Only one will win the Playstation 4.
  • 10 x Gamers with most Referrals will have a chance to win 1 out of 10 random Steam Games.
  • 10 x Random Gamers who Shared and Liked one of original announcemnt posts will have a chance to win 1 out of 10 random Stean Games.

 

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List of games available to win:

  • 3 Steam keys for Saints Row IV 
  • 5 Steam keys for Legends of Aethereus 
  • 1 Steam Key for Horizon
  • 2 Steam Keys for Broken Age
  • 5 Steam keys for Sleeping dogs 
  • 2 Steam keys for Banished
  • 2 Steam keys for Starbound
  • 5 Steam keys for Darkout 
  • 5 Steam keys for Fist Puncher 
  • 5 Steam keys for Postmortem 
  • 5 Steam keys for Tetrobot and Co.
  • 5 Steam keys for AErena – Clash of Champions 
  • 5 Steam keys for Survival Squad